Toilet Repair

A common issue is uncovered when you stand up and realize that your feet are wet. Water seeping out on your floor from the base of the toilet bowl is indicative of several potential problems. While it could indicate that the porcelain has been compromised, it’s not generally likely that this could happen without you being aware. Some thing would have to hit the toilet very hard for this to have happened.

Generally, this leak is the result of a compromised wax ring. If a toilet is loosely bolted to the floor, it will rock ever so little while a person sits on the toilet. Over a duration, this gentle rocking motion can cause the wax ring to work loose. Don’t worry, this is something you can definitely fix.

Turn off the supply of water to the toilet and then flush it one more time once more. This should deplete both the bowl and the tank. Disconnect the water supply and then loosen the bolts that hold the toilet to the floor. Once it is loose, simply pull straight up on the toilet and lift it off of the drain pipe where it had been. The old wax ring should be left behind on the floor. Get a a scraper tool and remove the wax.

We’re being hopeful you were thinking ahead and picked up a new ring prior to you pulling up the toilet. A brand new wax ring shouldn’t set you back more than $3.00. Put the new ring in place and then replace the toilet back into place. Push downward onto the toilet with some authority to make sure that the new wax ring is completely seated, and then bolt the toilet back down to the floor, make sure that it is firm enough to keep the toilet from rocking. Be careful though, as you could crack the porcelain if you over tighten the bolts.

After you have figured out the basic operating principles of your toilet, it definitely is fairly easy and inexpensive to maintain.

We have dealt with one of the more common issues here, and you could definitely fix most problems related with toilets at the same time for under than $15.00. However keep in mind that you are working with a toilet, and you’ll most probably want to wear gloves while you relocate the toilet bowl from its flange on the floor.